Migration Project retracing of the Anishinabe migration route

The Migration Journey
http://greatlakesdirectory.org/migration/background.htm

Migration map .jpg (54Kb) / .gif (60Kb)

Lake Superior Walkers
Protectors of the Waters


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September 12, 2001
From: Craig Minowa lakes@cpinternet.com
Organization: EcoSource- EAGLE


2,200-Mile Great Lakes Walk Arrives In Duluth
Anishinabe Walkers Say Their Prophecies Discuss
Terrorist Attack and Spirit Mountain Fate



For immediate release:
For more information/photos check out the Migration Journey website at http://www.migrationjourney.cjb.net
> Local contact Craig Minowa (218) 626-1884 lakes@cpinternet.com


For centuries Anishinabe prophecies have discussed a historical Great Lakes walk that is now taking place. A group of Anishinabe people, who are conducting the 2,200 mile walk/run/bike from the eastern seacoast to the western shore of Lake Superior will arrive in Duluth on Thursday and will be leaving for Madelaine Island on Sunday. While here, the group will be meeting with local communities to build alliances and discuss past and present prophecies and how they relate to critical modern day issues such as environmental problems and global cultural struggles, like the current terrorist attacks against the U.S. A gathering open to all local citizens, environmental groups, Fond du Lac tribal members and the Migration Walkers will be held outside near the Spirit Mountain Chalet on Saturday evening. A potluck meal will be held at 6pm followed by ceremonies that are open to all in attendance. They will also be speaking to classes at local schools on Friday.

The Migration Journey is a continuation of the work that began during last year�s �Walk to Remember� around Lake Superior. That walk gave a voice to many communities affected by the contamination of their waterways and watersheds, from human and animal waste to PCB and mercury contamination.The walkers are part of The Migration Journey for the Seventh Generation, following the ancient Anishnabek migration route from the eastern seacoast to Madeline Island in Lake Superior. The Anishinabek--- the Ojibway, Odawa, and the Potawatomi---are Native peoples of the Great Lakes region. The Migration Journey is a call for unity to stand against the pollution of the Great Lakes and the misuse and waste of Great Lakes water.

Their mission is to reach out and educate all people about protecting the waters, and restoring the earth�s natural balance for seven generations to come. �Now is the time that people wake up, make a stand and speak out for the water to continue the life of the future generations,� said Migration Journey walker Corrine Tooshkenig, Walpole Island First Nation. "When the givers of life and our future generations are at risk it is nothing short of environmental genocide. We are all complicit in a cultural suicide,� said Migration Journey organizer Kevin Best.

The 2,200 mile walk includes 7 sacred stopping places that are discussed in ancient Anishinabe prophecies. One of those sacred sites is here in Duluth on Spirit Mountain."Our people have recognized Spirit Mountain as a sacred site for thousands of years," said Alberta Fairbanks of the Fond du Lac tribe at Monday's City Council meeting, where major decisions were being made in regards to whether or not to approve a work permit for the proposed Spirit Mountain golf course."Spirit Mountain is our church, and I know our ancestors are buried up there." Fairbanks said.

During this Saturday evening's events on Spirit Mountain a traditional Anishinabe Shaking Tent cermony will be held. According to Butch Stone, tribal member of the Bad River Reservation in Wisconsin, and lead Migration Journey Walker, "The ceremonies on Saturday night will provide us with new prophecies in regards to the future of Spirit Mountain and the next steps to take after the terrorist attacks." For more information, go to the Migration Journey website at http://www.migrationjourney.cjb.net or contact Craig Minowa at 218-626-1884.





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2,200 mile walk to protect the Great Lakes
coming to Detroit and St. Clair rivers area this week



August 20, 2001
Kevin Best at (pager) 416-600-7023
Kim Wensaut (cell ph.) 734-395-1550
http://migrationjourney.cjb.net


A group of people who are conducting a 2,200 mile walk/run/bike from the eastern seacoast to the western shore of Lake Superior will be in the Detroit-Walpole Island-Sarnia area this Tuesday to Saturday. While here, the group will be meeting with local communities to build alliances and discuss what can be done to protect the water for our children and grandchildren.

The walkers are part of The Migration Journey for the Seventh Generation, following the ancient Anishnabek migration route from the eastern seacoast to Madeline Island in Lake Superior. The Anishinabek�the Ojibway, Odawa, and the Potawatomi�are Native peoples of the Great Lakes region.

The Migration Journey is a call for unity to stand against the pollution of the Great Lakes and the misuse and waste of Great Lakes water. Our mission is to reach out and educate all people about protecting the waters, and restoring the earth�s natural balance for seven generations to come.

�Now is the time that people wake up, make a stand and speak out for the water to continue the life of the future generations,� said Migration Journey walker Corrine Tooshkenig, Walpole Island First Nation.

In the 34 km stretch between Walpole Island and Sarnia, there are more than two dozen of the world�s largest chemical and petrochemical companies, whose discharges into the St. Clair River have made the water undrinkable for residents at Walpole Island.

�Scientists tell us that women and children are now considered �at risk populations� for environmental diseases in the Great Lake region. When the givers of life and our future generations are at risk it is nothing short of environmental genocide. We are all complicit in a cultural suicide,� said Migration Journey organizer Kevin Best.

The journey retraces the steps of the Anishinabek ancestors� historical migration route with seven stopping places, which are spoken about in their prophecies. Walpole Island is the third of these seven sacred stopping places.

The Migration Journey is a widening of the circle of awareness and a continuation of the work that began during last year�s �Walk to Remember� around Lake Superior. That walk gave a voice to many communities affected by the contamination of their waterways and watersheds, from human and animal waste to PCB and mercury contamination.

For updated schedule information or interview opportunities contact Kevin Best, 416-600-7023 (pager) or Kim Wensaut at 734-395-1550 (cell phone). For background information and information on how you can help see the website at http://migrationjourney.cjb.net

Schedule for the week (all events open to public)

Tuesday August 21
early evening - Walkers arrive at Walpole Island First Nation, Ontario

Thursday August 23
7 p.m. ? Public reception: presentation by walkers and discussion at American Indian Health, 4880 Lawndale, Detroit. 313-846-3718

Friday August 24
5 p.m. - Community gathering: presentation by walkers and discussion at Walpole Island. The Arena, across from Thunderbird Plaza.

Saturday August 25
morning ? Walking/biking to Aamjiwnaang First Nation, Sarnia, Ontario

1 p.m. - Community gathering: presentation by walkers and discussion, Aamjiwnaang First Nation Community Center, Sarnia, Ontario. Contact in Sarnia - Ron Yellowman 519-332-3190




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2,200 mile walk to protect the Great Lakes crosses
Rainbow Bridge into Canada this Saturday



August 15, 2001 Contact: Maria Maybee at 716-886-0142
For immediate release or Kevin Best at (cell ph.) 416-995-0715


On Saturday August 18 at 10:30 a.m., a group of people walking from the east coast of Canada to Lake Superior's eastern shore will gather at the Schoellkopf Museum in Niagara Falls and walk across the Rainbow Bridge into Canada at Noon. The walkers are part of The Migration Journey for the Seventh Generation, following the ancient Anishnabek migration route from the St. Lawrence River to Madeline Island in Lake Superior. The Anishinabek-the Ojibway, Odawa, and the Potawatomi-are Native peoples of the Great Lakes region. The Migration Journey is a call for unity to stand against the pollution of the Great Lakes and the misuse and waste of Great Lakes water. Our mission is to reach out and educate all people about protecting the waters, and restoring the earth's natural balance for seven generations to come. The journey retraces the steps of the Anishinabek ancestors' historical migration route with seven stopping places, which are spoken about in their prophecies. Niagara Falls is the second of these seven sacred stopping places. The Migration Journey is a widening of the circle of awareness and a continuation of the work that began during last year's "Walk to Remember" around Lake Superior. That walk gave a voice to many communities affected by the contamination of their waterways and watersheds, from human and animal waste to PCB and mercury contamination. While in the area this week, the group will be working with local communities to build alliances and promote unity. Some of these events will be open to the public. Contact Kevin Best for updated event and schedule information.

Maria Maybee
Habitat and Biodiversity Program Coordinator

Great Lakes United Cassety Hall - Buffalo State College, 1300 Elmwood Avenue
Buffalo, NY 14222

mmaybee@glu.org ph: (716) 886-0142 fax:-0303

We have a responsibility to take care of our Mother Earth who takes care of us and provides us with all we need.

All life is sacred.
Water is life.

We see that:
The waters are being poisoned.
The animals are being poisoned
The plants are being poisoned
We are being poisoned.

It is our natural right as human beings to have clean water. No individual, group, organization, corporation or government has a right to violate that natural right or to take that blessing away from our children and grandchildren. - Kim Wensaut

Join the migration walk - get connected http://migrationjourney.cjb.net



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Please Forward to your lists
Immediate release July 30, 2001
Donna Lynk: 715 682 2996
Kevin Best
1 888 371-0057/416 600 7023-pager
Web site: http://migrationjourney.cjb.net/

Walk for the Water Begins Unity of the People for the Seventh Generation

"We were told to speak out for the things that cannot speak for themselves, for the animals, the fish, the winged ones, the plants and herbs, the water, air and the Earth."

-Butch Stone
Bad River Anishinabe
Migration Journey organizer


This summer walkers will embark on a 2,200 mile journey following the ancient Anishinabek migration route from the St. Lawrence River to Madeline Island in Lake Superior. The Migration Journey for the Seventh Generation is a call for unity to all peoples to stand against the pollution and contamination of the Great Lakes. Our mission is to reach out and educate all people about protecting the waters, and restoring the earth's natural balance for seven generations to come. ways.

Along the route the walkers will stop in communities that are affected by toxic threats to our environment, to network, share stories, and pray together, thereby creating a spiritual and political unity of all peoples for one common goal.

The Migration Journey is a continuation of the work began during last year's walk around Lake Superior: A Walk to Remember. During the walk it became apparent that many communities are affected by the contamination of their waterways and watersheds, from human and animal waste to PCB and mercury contamination. It also became apparent that a multitude of corporations contribute to the environmental degradation of the Great Lakes, destroying the health of the communities dependent upon this system of water ways.

The Migration Journey is a widening of the circle that was created with last year's walk.. The Migration Journey will retrace the ancient steps of the Anishinabe ancestors' migration route with seven stopping places which are spoken about in prophecies: St. Lawrence River, Niagara Falls, Detroit River, Manitoulin Island, Sault Ste. Marie, Duluth and Madeline Island. In consultation with spiritual elders, at each of the seven stops, fires will be lit and ceremonies will be conducted, along with applying the prophecies we were given at these stops to the state of the environment today. As well, events will be organized at each stopping place, where the local community will be called upon to share their stories, concerns and prayers for the waters in their areas. The Migration Journey is about bringing people together to find solutions around the Great Lakes to live sustainably.

Contact Kevin Best for interview opportunities
1 888 371-0057/416 600 7023-pager sml@interlog.com

Map of Anishinabe (Ojibwe) Migration Journey
http://treaty.indigenousnative.org/common/migration.gif or http://treaty.indigenousnative.org/common/migration.jpg

 

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The group has adopted the philosophy of the Seventh Generation teaching of the Anishinabe whereby the decisions, which are being made today, must recognize the obligations that we have to the future generations.

As a group of people of all colors and backgrounds, we realize there is a need to reach out, educate and encourage all people to protect the Earth, her waters and living things dependant upon her, in an effort to restore the natural balance for the seven generations to come. We aim to accomplish this by relating the teachings of the original peoples of North America to the findings of modern science regarding the state of the natural environment today.

Lake Superior is the largest freshwater lake in the world. For many people, it is an important source of food, livelihood and drinking water. Lake Superior is also an important part of the spirituality of the Anishinabeg as passed down by our ancestors and oral histories. It is now threatened due to contamination, global warming caused by over-development, and a growing, global water crisis that further threatens the sanctity of its waters and many life forms that depend on it, including, people.

On June 25, 2000, a group of individuals gathered together and formed a network of communities in order to bring awareness of the state of the environment around the Great Lakes. This courageous group embarked on and completed a 1,200-mile journey around Lake Superior. The journey arrived on August 28, 2000 where it began, at the southern shores of Lake Superior on the Bad River Ojibwe Reservation in Wisconsin.

A WALK TO REMEMBER- A SACRED JOURNEY FOR SEVEN GENERATIONS was lived as a spiritual journey around Lake Superior to bring forth community visions to protect the air, land and water for the Seven Generations yet to come. During the Walk to Remember it became apparent that we are not alone in our concern for clean air and water. Many communities have been affected and many waterways and watersheds are contaminated in a variety of ways, from human and animal waste to PCB and mercury contamination. It also became apparent that a multitude of corporations contributed to the environmental degradation of the Great Lakes, thus to the detrimental health of those communities dependant upon this system of water ways.

Currently, we are working on our next venture in order to continue to raise awareness of the pollution and the contamination of the Great Lakes. The Migration Project will entail retracing of the Anishinabe migration route. The journey will begin out east at the mouth of the St. Lawrence Seaway and continue along to the seven stopping places that are spoken about in prophecies. In an ancient Ojibwe prophecy we are taught that the Anishinabe people migrated from the Great Waters of the East and followed the sacred megis shell.

It has been told that the people stopped during this journey seven times when the megis shell appeared to them. Seven prophets came to Anishinabe. They came at a time when the people were living a full and peaceful life on the North Eastern coast of North America. These prophets left the people with seven predictions of what the future would bring. Each of the prophecies was called a fire and each fire referred to a particular era of time that would come in the future. Thus, the teachings of the seven prophets are now called the "Seven Fires".

Suggested stopping places of the Migration Journey are:
TURTLE-SHAPED ISLAND (ALONG RIVER)
NIAGARA FALLS
DETROIT RIVER
MANITOULIN ISLAND
SAULT STE. MARIE
DULUTH
MADELINE ISLAND

In consultation spiritual elders, such as Mr. Ed Benton-Benai and members of the Three Fires Midewiwin Lodge, at each of the seven stops, fires will be lit and ceremonies will be conducted, along with applying the prophecies we were given at these stops to the state of the environment today. Some of the journey will be a walk/run, with most of Lake Michigan being undertaken with canoe by water. A web site is currently being developed and will be updated daily during the project.

The Great Lakes Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie and Ontario are of critical importance to the quality of life of not only the Anishinabe people, but also all other communities surrounding these water bodies. More than 90 percent of the 38 million U.S. and Canadian residents in the Great Lakes basin rely on the Great Lakes for drinking water. Twenty percent of U.S. and half of Canadian manufacturing are located in the Great Lakes basin; these rely on water as a raw material and for shipping lanes.

The Great Lakes have come a long way in the last generation, after more than a century of commercial fishing; lumbering, heavy industry and exotic invaders took a toll. The lakes struggled through pollution, eutrophication, beach closings and fish consumption advisories. It is easy to forget today that pollution killed most of the commercial stocks of fish in the Great Lakes; that in 1970 Life magazine declared Lake Erie "dead", mainly because of phosphorus from sewage treatment plants and factories. As an industrial, densely populated area, water quality in the Great Lakes basin remains an issue: Heavy metal and chemical contamination persists.

Contamination such as mercury, copper, lead, DDT and PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) are in the Great Lakes. There are fish consumption advisories in all five Great Lakes. Now and into the foreseeable future, we will need to watch for persistent, bioaccumulative toxic substances that may degrade the ecosystem of the Great Lakes and have long-term health implications for human and wildlife populations.

For more information contact:

Butch Stone
Ahmoose
Donna Lynk 715-682-2996
Elizabeth Post 715-682-5539
April Stone-Dahl 715-492-3229

The walk is scheduled to start on June 21, 2001 near the mouth of the St Lawrence Seaway.

Lake Superior Walkers: Protectors of the Waters

Route 2, Box 378C
Ashland, Wisconsin 54806

P.O. Box 266
Mellen, Wisconsin 54546

Fund raising efforts are currently underway. Donations can be sent in care of:

" Walk around the Lakes" Fund Associated Bank
221 4th Avenue West
Ashland, Wisconsin 54806


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