CHIAPAS CHIAPAS MEDIA PROJECT



Chiapas Updates

 

Chiapas Media Project
West Coast/Midwest/Northwest
Spring Tour 2003: March-May

The Chiapas Media Project (CMP) seeks university, religious and community-based sponsors to host screenings on our 6th annual spring tour March-May 2003. The tour features all new videos produced by indigenous video makers from the states of Chiapas and Guerrero, Mexico. Dates are scheduled on a first come, first-served basis and fill up fast, so please contact us as soon as possible. The Chiapas Media Project is a bi-national partnership that provides video equipment, computers and training enabling marginalized indigenous and campesino communities in Southern Mexico to create their own media.

The CMP has presented videos at numerous universities, museums, and film and video festivals around the world. Last Fall 2002, the CMP did presentations at Brandeis, Drew University, Hampshire College, Oberlin College, University of Oklahoma, University of Kansas, Smithsonian Ntl. Museum of the American Indian, the Margaret Mead Film and Video Festival and the Intl. Human Rights Film Fest in Buenos Aires among others. The CMP is available for presentations at universities, and public venues.

Alexandra Halkin, CMP Founding Director will present the videos. Presentations last between one-and-a-half and two hours and include a discussion on the role of indigenous and campesino produced media in the context of the current political situations in Chiapas and Guerrero. Alexandra will also discuss a new CMP project recently funded by the MacArthur Foundation that will document human rights violations in Guerrero. A Q & A session follows the video screening. Presentations can be done in either Spanish or English. Sponsors need to provide a video projector, a VCR with audio system and comfortable seating.

The CMP asks for an honorarium based on the means of the host organization to help continue the work of the CMP. Information packets are available that include articles on the CMP, bios, photos etc. Please check our web site: www.chiapasmediaproject.org for more information.

For further information, please call Alex at 773-583-7728 or
e-mail us at cmp@chiapasmediaproject.org
VIDEOS TO BE SCREENED AT PRESENTATIONS:
***CMP videos are available for purchase at www.chiapasmediaproject.org

We Speak Against Injustice
(Tzeltal and Spanish with English sub-titles, 34:00, 2003)

We Speak Against Injustice follows the Zapatista caravan in March of 2002 that visited 11 cities on the way to Mexico City where the EZLN along with other indigenous groups presented the San Andres Accords to the Mexican Congress. We see what has happened since the Mexican Congress changed the San Andres Accords against the will of indigenous people throughout Mexico and ratified them into the constitution. The second half of the video documents the upsurge in paramilitary violence in Chiapas that began in August 2002. This violence is seen in the context of globalization and pressure that the state and federal government is putting on the Zapatista communities to leave their land so that their natural resources can be sold.

Song of the Earth: Traditional Music from the Highlands of Chiapas
( Tzotzil with English subtitles, 16:42, 2002)

Tzotzil elders explain the significance of traditional music and the role of musicians in their communities. Various celebrations, songs and dances are presented including the festival of San Andres, the most important celebration of the year. Elders talk about the influence of western music and dress on youth and express their hopes that indigenous youth will maintain their traditions and culture. Song of the Earth demonstrates the strength of communities in resistance as they struggle to preserve their cultural heritage amidst the low intensity war and the allure of pop culture.

Zapata's Garden
(Tzeltal and Spanish w/English subtitles, 2002, 19:13)

Shot and produced by indigenous men and women video makers in the Autonomous Municipality of Emiliano Zapata this video looks at the new society that the Zapatista's are building. Zapata 's Garden shows how this new municipality is fighting the effects of globalization and government corruption through their work in their collective garden. Community members talk about the importance of collective work in building this new society. "We don't want things to be as they were before. Now we have land to work, and with it we will feed ourselves and our children ".

Reclaiming Justice: Guerrero's Indigenous Community Police
(Spanish with English subtitles, 26:00, 2002)

Reclaiming Justice is the story of 42 Mixteco and Tlapaneco communities in the Costa-Monta-a region of Guerrero who, faced with injustice and corruption of local authorities, established the Indigenous Community Police (ICP) in 1995. Based on the traditional Indigenous justice system, the ICP is a volunteer organization elected by regional assembly. With the ICP, crime dropped substantially, organized crime has nearly disappeared, and police corruption is nonexistent. Instead of supporting the ICP, state and local governments attacked them publicly and claimed that they function outside the law. Reclaiming Justice gives voice to members of the ICP, demonstrates their success in creating community security, and shows how the ICP restored dignity and pride to Indigenous communities despite opposition by corrupt authorities.

 

 

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TWO NEW VIDEOS FROM THE CHIAPAS MEDIA PROJECT

May 2002

The Chiapas Media Project announces two new videos, "Walking Towards the Dawn: The memory, resistance and hope of the communities displaced by war in Chiapas" and "Zapata's Garden".

The Chiapas Media Project is a bi-national organization that provides video and computer equipment and training to marginalized indigenous communities in Southern Mexico. The following videos have been seen recently at the Taos Talking Picture Festival, Arizona Intl. Film and Video Festival, Free Speech TV and the Sundance Film Festival.

For more information contact the Chiapas Media Project 773-583-7728 or cmp@chiapasmediaproject.org

PLEASE SEND PAYMENT TO:
Chiapas Media Project
4834 N. Springfield
Chicago, IL 60625

 

 

 

New Video Release From The Chiapas Media Project


The Chiapas Media Project announces the release of �The Silence of the Zapatistas,� a new video produced and edited by Chiapas indigenous video makers. The Silence of the Zapatistas, documents the Zapatista communities� non-violent protests and confrontations with the Mexican military during the period of 1996 to December 2000 in the Autonomous Municipality of San Pedro Michoacan.

The Silence of the Zapatistas
2001, 12:35 minutes
Spanish with English sub-titles
Prices: Individual $20 Universities/Institutions $70

To order please send payments to:
Chiapas Media Project
4834 N. Springfield
Chicago, IL 60625

Other Recent Releases from the Chiapas Media Project (read descriptions below):
  1. The Sacred Land
  2. Education in Resistance
  3. The Strength of the Indigenous People of Mut Vitz: Producing Fair Trade Organic Coffee in the Highlands of Chiapas
  4. Defending the Forests: The Struggle of the Campesino Environmentalists of Guerrero
The Strength of the Indigenous People of Mut Vitz: Producing Fair Trade Organic Coffee in the Highlands of Chiapas (Tzotzil and Spanish, w/ English subtitles, 27:05 min.)

This video, looks at the lives and work of the organic coffee farmers of the Mut Vitz Coffee Collective.for four years. Begun in 1996, the Mut Vitz Cooperative currently has more than 1000 members. The video was shot and digitally edited by two videomakers who are members of the collective. Over a year in the making, Strength traces the entire organic coffee production process: from seedling to transplant, from cultivation to the roasted bean. The video shows us the challenges that the collective faces in processing their coffee for market and Mut Vitz� achievements using a fair trade model of distribution.

Individual: $25                     Institutional: $80

Defending the Forests: The Struggle of the Campesino Environmentalists of Guerrero (Spanish w/ English Subtitles, 18:10 min.)

Defending the Forests delves into the social and environmental effects of illegal deforestation in Guerrero�s Petatl�n and Coyuca de Catal�n regions. Deforestation began in the 1950�s and accelerated under the despotic rule of Governor Ruben Figueroa Figueroa. Since the advent of NAFTA in 1994, logging, militarization and repression all increased in the rural regions of the state. US-based corporations like Boise Cascade have left deserts where virgin forests once stood.

The Organization of the Campesino Environmentalists (OCE) organized and forced Boise Cascade to close up shop, but now are targets of a government and Army-sponsored campaign of repression to silence them. The video exposes the case of OCE co-founders and Rudolfo Montiel and Teodoro Cabrera. Both were recently sentenced to seven years in prison on false charges of weapons and drug trafficking for their courageous activism in defense of the forests.

Individual: $20                     Institutional: $70

The Sacred Land (Tzeltal and Spanish with English sub-titles, 18:36 min.)

For more than 500 years indigenous people in Chiapas have been struggling to regain ownership of their lands. Until the Zapatista uprising in 1994, most indigenous people in Chiapas existed by working on large plantations for

rich landowners. The Sacred Land describes what life was like on these plantations. Going back four generations, it includes stories about the slavery-like conditions that people endured. Produced and edited by indigenous video makers, The Sacred Land provides a context for the events of 1994 through a unique insight into the past. The second half of the video shows how life has changed since 1994 and expresses the hopes and dreams of these communities for their collective future.

Individual: $20                     Institutional: $70

Education in Resistance (Tzeltal and Spanish with English sub-titles, 21:00 min.)

The Mexican Constitution states that every citizen has a right to a free education. For many Mexicans, especially those of indigenous heritage, this right has never been realized. Education in Resistance looks at the education system that the Mexican government has been providing to indigenous people in Chiapas and why they decided to create an autonomous educational system. Elders describe their experiences in government schools, where they had to pay to attend public school and often experienced physical and psychological abuse. Education promoters in the autonomous system speak about their desire to teach in their communities, the importance of teaching bi-lingual classes, how military presence affects daily life and parents express their hopes for their children�s futures.

Individual: $20 $20                     Institutional: $70

 

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New Video Releases
by Indigenous Videomakers from Chiapas

The Chiapas Media Project announces the release of two brand new videos produced by members of indigenous autonomous communities in Chiapas, Oaxaca and Guerrero. Both videos are available with English subtitles.

The two new videos are:

The Strength of the Indigenous People of Mut Vitz
(Tzotzil and Spanish, w/ English subtitles, 27:05 min.)

This video, shot and digitally edited by two video makers from Oventic, documents the Mut Vitz coffee growing collective. Over a year in the making, Strength beautifully traces the entire organic coffee production process: from seedling to transplant, from cultivation to the roasted bean. With care and sensitivity for surrounding eco-system and the plants themselves, Mut Vitz produced thousands of pounds of high quality organic coffee last year. A portion of each video sale is donated to the collective to continue their dedicated work.

Defending the Forests: The Struggle of the Campesino Environmentalists of Guerrero (Spanish w/ English Subtitles, 18:10 min.)

Defending the Forests delves into the social and environmental effects of illegal deforestation in Guerrero�s Petatl�n and Coyuca de Catal�n regions. Since the advent of NAFTA in 1994, logging, militarization and repression all increased in the rural regions of the state. US-based corporations like Boise Cascade have left deserts where virgin forests once stood. The Organization of the Campesino Environmentalists (OCE) organized and forced Boise Cascade to close up shop, but now are targets of a government and Army-sponsored campaign of repression to silence them. The video exposes the case of OCE co-founder and 1999 Goldman Environmental Prize Winner Rudolfo Montiel, who was recently sentenced to seven years in prison on false charges of weapons and drug trafficking for his courageous activism in defense of the forests.

To purchase one of these new videos from the Chiapas Media Project, fill out the following form and send your check or money order to:

Chiapas Media Project, 4834 N. Springfield, Chicago, IL 60625


ORDER FORM

Number of videos
__________   Defending the Forests: The Struggle of the Campesino
             Environmentalists of Guerrero
             Price: $25                    Institutional Price: $80

__________   The Strength of the Indigenous People of Mut Vitz
             Price: $20                    Institutional Price: $70


NAME _________________________________________

ADDRESS __________________________________________________________

STATE __________________________ COUNTRY _________________________

                        MAIL/ZIP CODE ____________________________

Shipping and handling: Please add $4 for first video and $1 for each extra video. For more information call the Chiapas Media Project at 773-583-7728 or cmp@chiapasmediaproject.org

Other previously released titles from the Chiapas Media Project:


CHIAPAS MEDIA PROJECT VIDEOS

The Chiapas Media Project provides video equipment, computers and training for marginalized Indigenous communities in Chiapas, Mexico. The resulting videotapes offer a unique, firsthand perspective on the lives and struggles of these communities.

Chiapas Media Project/The Indigenous Family( La Familia Indigena) is a compilation of two tapes. The Chiapas Media Project documents the work of the Chiapas Media Project. The 11 minute video features interviews with community members about the effects of militarization in Chiapas and the ways that video technology will be used to record human rights abuses, cultural events, and daily work.

La Familia Indigena takes an intimate look at the role of men and women in the community of Ejido Morelia. Men and women discuss their individual and collective work. Shot and edited by community members only six weeks after their first exposure to video equipment, this six minute work contains unique shots inside the homes and work places of proud campesinos struggling for a better life. 1998, 17 minutes, English subtitles
Price: $10         Institutional Price: $50 Women United (Mujeres Unidas) Women United focuses on women�s collective work in the autonomous community of 17 de Noviembre. Collective work is an important organizing tool for women involved in the struggles for social and economic justice in Zapatista communities. The video shows women working on their collective gardens, bakery and store, inter-cut with interviews about how collective work has changed and strengthened the fabric of community life.

1999,16:00 minutes, Tzeltal with English sub-titles
Price: $20         nstitutional Price: $70

The Healer (El Curandero) is the first fiction produced by indigenous videomakers trained by the Chiapas Media Project. When Jacinto falls ill, relatives call a traditional healer because the family can�t afford a medical doctor. The Healer takes an intimate look at traditional Mayan healing practices�a combination of indigenous rituals and Christianity.

1999, 34 minutes, Tzotzil with English sub-titles
Price: $20         Institutional Price: $75

Recovery of San Andres Sacamch�en (Recuperacion de San de Andres Sacamch�en) and The National Consultation (Consulta Nacional) (compiled on one tape)

Recovery of San Andres Sacamch�en (11 minutes) On April 6, 1999, interim Governor Albores ordered state police to dismantle the autonomous Zapatista council in the community of San Andres Sacamch�en, which had governed since 1995. Army troops and Public Security forces occupied the city hall and installed a PRI mayor. The next day, over 3,000 indigenous campesi�os marched on the town, peacefully re-took the city hall and re-installed their elected officials. This 11 minute video captures the power of organized civil society as thousands of indigenous civilians demonstrate grassroots democracy. To this day there is a 24 hour watch by community members guarding the town hall to prevent further aggressions by the Governor.

The National Consultation (20 minutes) On March 12, 1999, 5,000 Zapatistas left Chiapas to conduct a massive popular education campaign throughout Mexico on indigenous rights and the San Andres Accords. The ensuing nine day campaign led to the �Consulta Nacional� in which citizens were asked to vote on four basic questions regarding indigenous rights. Over three million people cast their ballots in favor of the Zapatista proposals. This video documents the voyage of the Zapatista representatives in the communities of the Municipality of San Juan de la Libertad.

1999, 31 minutes
Price: $20         Institutional Price: $70

Tour `99: The Sugar Cane Collective ( El Collectivo de la Ca�a de Azucar) and New Years Eve 1999, Ejido Morelia (A�o Nuevo 1999, Ejido Morelia) (Compiled on one video tape.)

The video begins with a short description of the Chiapas Media Project and interviews with students involved in our computer, women�s and human rights workshops.

The Sugar Cane Collective (6 minutes) illustrates a central activity of the municipality of El Trabajo, where men, women and children combine efforts to produce sugar with hand-made tools, hard work and joy. This amazing video was produced and edited �in camera� (after only four days of video training), and demonstrates the talent and creativity of the indigenous video makers.

New Years Eve 1999, Ejido Morelia (20 minutes) documents New Years eve festivities, the most important celebration of the year, held in the context of government oppression. This video was produced by two videomakers from the region of �San Andr�s Sacamch�en de los Pobres�.

1998, 32 minutes
Price: $20         Institutional Price: $70

Chiapas 1998: The Bad Harvest ( La Mala Cosecha) is a collaboration between indigenous and non-indigenous videomakers which documents severe food shortages in 1998. A six month drought followed by heavy rains and flooding destroyed 50% of the corn crops and 80% of the bean crops. This natural disaster, combined with the constant harassment of 60,000 troops and coupled with extreme poverty and marginalization, left the communities with few options.

1998, 14:30 minutes
Price: $15         Institutional Price: $50


ORDER FORM

Number of videos
__________   Chiapas Media Project/ The Indigenous Family
             (La Familia Indigena)
             Price: $10                    Institutional Price: $50

__________   Women United (Mujeres Unidas)
             Price: $20                    Institutional Price: $70

__________   The Healer (El Curandero)
             Price: $20                    Institutional Price: $75

__________   Recovery of San Andres Sacamch�en and The National
             Consultation
             Price: $20                    Institutional Price: $70

__________   Tour `99: The Sugar Cane Collective and New Years Eve
             1999, Ejido Morelia
             Price: $20                    Institutional Price: $70

__________   Chiapas 1998: The Bad Harvest ( La Mala Cosecha)
             Price: $15                    Institutional Price: $50
 
NAME _________________________________________

ADDRESS __________________________________________________________

STATE __________________________ COUNTRY _________________________

                        MAIL/ZIP CODE ____________________________

Shipping and handling: please add $4 for one video and $1 for each extra video. Send order form and check to Chiapas Media Project, 4834 N. Springfield, Chicago, IL 60625. For more information contact the Chiapas Media Project at 773-583-7728 or cmp@chiapasmediaproject.org.

Click Here for a printable page of these Order Forms.



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The Chiapas Media Project announces a new release from indigenous video-makers, produced by the autonomous municipalities of Los Altos, Chiapas. The new tape consists of two video shorts that document the most significant events of March/April 1999 in Chiapas: the National Consulta and the recovery of San Andres Sacamch'en.

The Recovery of San Andres Sacamch'en de Los Pobres--(11 minutes)

This video captures the power of organized civil society as thousands of indigenous civilians demonstrate grassroots democracy. On April 7, 1999 Interim Governor Roberto Albores Guillen ordered the state police to dismantle (read: ransack) the autonomous council offices of the Municipality of San Andres Sacamch'en, site of the 1995/96 peace talks. The police ousted the elected indigenous leadership, occupied the city hall and installed a PRI mayor. The following day, over 3000 indigenous people marched on San Andres, peacefully re-took the town and re-installed their elected officials. Includes a powerful statement from the Autonomous Council read by a woman who serves on the Council.

The National Consultation in the Municipality of San Juan de la Libertad--(20 minutes)

On March 12, 1999, about 5000 Zapatistas left Chiapas to conduct a massive popular education campaign throughout Mexico on indigenous rights and the San Andres Accords. The ensuing 9-day campaign led to the "Consulta Nacional" in which Mexican citizens were asked to vote on four basic questions regarding indigenous rights. Over 3 million people cast their ballots infavor of the Zapatista's proposals. This video documents the voyage of the Zapatista representatives in the communities of the Municipality of San Juan de la Libertad.

The new release contains both of the above videos (32 minutes total). It is available for $20.

To order, send a $20 check or money order to:
    Chiapas Media Project--Los Altos tape
    4834 N. Springfield
    Chicago, IL 60625
E-mail us at: cmp@vida.com for a full listing of all available tapes produced by indigenous video-makers from Chiapas.

"Tour '99"�is the latest release from the indigenous video-makers in the Autonomous Regions in Chiapas. The video includes 3 parts. The first is a description of the Media Project and the various on-going programs that they sponsor--human rights monitoring, women's workshops and computer workshops.

The second part is an in-camera edit made by people in El Trabajo Autonomous Municipality about their sugar cane collective. The third part, entitled "A�o Nuevo 1999" ("New Years 1999") was filmed in Ejido Morelia and features exclusive video footage of the most recent New Years' celebration there. The video was shot and edited by videomakers from the community of San Andres Sakamch'en.

Also available: "The Bad Harvest" is a fourteen-minute snapshot that documents how 1998's severe weather, intensive militarization and a lack of technical assistance have affected crops in the Chiapan highlands. It tells a poignant story of poverty using first hand testimony from several indigenous communities. "Now we cannot work because we are afraid of the army," laments a young woman who traces a large part of the problem to the military presence throughout the state.

The video is a co-production of indigenous youth who are learning video skills through the Chiapas Media Project and professional video producers from Mexico and the US.

    Tour '99-- $20
    The Bad Harvest-- $15
    Set of 2-- $30
Send checks to:
    Chiapas Media Project
    4834 N. Springfield
    Chicago, IL 60625
or contact the Chiapas Media Project at: cmp@vida.com or call 773-583-7728

 

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May 19, 1999 - New Video from the Chiapas Media Project

The Chiapas Media Project announces the release of a new 32 minute video tape, "Tour `99", produced by Indigenous video makers from Chiapas, Mexico.

The Chiapas Media Project is a bi-national partnership that is providing video and, computer equipment and training to indigenous communities in Chiapas, Mexico. Our mission is to create and nurture processes that empower communities to develop alternative media so that their voices can be heard around the world.

Tour `99 includes: (Three videos)

The video begins with a short montage and description of the Chiapas Media Project�s current programs. There are interviews with students involved in computer, women�s video and human rights promoters workshops. The students discuss how this technology and training will be used and why it is important to their communities.

"El Colectivo de la Ca�a de Azucar" (The Sugar Cane Collective) illustrates a central activity of the municipality of " El Trabajo", where men, women and children combine efforts to produce sugar with hand-made tools, hard work and joy. This amazing video was produced and edited "in camera," and demonstrates the talent and creativity of the indigenous video producers.

"A�o Nuevo 1999, Ejido Morelia" (New Years 1999) documents New Years Eve festivities, the most important celebration of the year, held in the context of government oppression. The video was produced by two videomakers from the region of "San Andres Sakamch'en de los Pobres".
1999, 32 minutes     Price: $20     Institutional Price: $70

Other Videos Available:

"Chiapas 1998: La Mala Cosecha" (The Bad Harvest) is a collaboration between indigenous and non-indigenous videomakers which documents the food shortages that occurred in 1998. A severe drought followed by heavy rains and flooding destroyed 50% of the corn crops and 80% of the bean crops. The crisis caused by these natural disasters is an extra added hardship to the extreme poverty and marginalization these communities suffer. Community members discuss the situation and explain how it is aggravated by the militarization of these communities and the constant violations of individual and collective rights.
1998, 14:30 minutes     Price: $15     Institutional Price: $50

"La Familia Indigena" (The Indigenous Family) takes an intimate look at the role of men and women in the community of Ejido Morelia. There are interviews with men and women who discuss their individual and collective work. Included on this tape at the beginning, are interviews with women who explain what happens when the Federal Army enters a community and community members talk about the importance of having access to video equipment and the types of videos they will produce.
1998, 17 minutes     Price: $10     Institutional Price: $50

To order please send check or money order to:
The Chiapas Media Project
4834 N. Springfield
Chicago, IL 60625





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