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Wisconsin gubernatorial candidates and the Crandon Mine issue.

 

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Gubernatorial Candidates� Positions
on Mining in Wisconsin

Wisconsin Indian Education Association asked each of the gubernatorial candidates six questions on the topics of Indian Education and Gaming. The candidates for Wisconsin State Governor are: Ty Bollerud, James Doyle, Alan Eisenberg, Scott McCallum, Mike Mangan, Aneb Jah Rasta Sensas-Utcha Nefer-I, Ed Thompson, and Jim Young. WIEA received responses from Bollerud, Doyle, and Young. Enclosed is a copy of the letter and questions we sent each candidate and the candidate's responses.

We hope this information is useful in making an informed vote for Governor on November 5. Please share this correspondence with others

Chris Munson,
Central Region Representative
Wisconsin Indian Education Association




The Cover Letter:

Dear _____:


Wisconsin Indian Education Association (WIEA) was established in 1985 by a group of concerned Indian educators to carry on the efforts of the former Great Lakes Intertribal Council Education subcommittee. The mission of WIEA is to promote educational opportunities for Indian people of Wisconsin through a unified effort of Indian and non-Indian members interested in the socio-economic advancement of Indian people.

In accordance to our mission, WIEA is interested in the views of the 2002 gubernatorial candidates regarding education issues that affect American Indians in the state of Wisconsin. Issues that affect American Indian education are often not included in public dialogue or debate. Please take time and respond to the questions on the following page.

Responses may be shared with WIEA's general membership to provide information about the gubernatorial candidates. We see it as our responsibility to ask these critical questions and inform our concerned voters.


Sincerely,


Scott Beard
WIEA President

 


 

The Questions and Responses:


Questions for 2002 Gubernatorial Candidates

EDUCATION

Identify the unique educational needs of Native students. Please list them below.

Do you support the development of an Office of Indian Education to address issues identified by the Native peoples in Wisconsin? Explain.

How will you support and expand the Department of Public Instruction American Indian Studies Program?

GAMING

Explain your familiarity with the contents of Indian Gaming Compacts.

Who should be in control of Indian Gaming dollars?

What should these monies by used for?


Ty Bollerud-

EDUCATION

Identify the unique educational needs of Native students. Please list them below.

"I'm not native and I will not take a test!"

Do you support the development of an Office of Indian Education to address issues identified by the Native peoples in Wisconsin? Explain.

"If payed for by the Indian tribes, (Ho-Chuck & other.)"

How will you support and expand the Department of Public Instruction American Indian Studies Program?

If payed for by Indian tribes - gambling.

GAMING

Explain your familiarity with the contents of Indian Gaming Compacts.

"Indian tribes have there own nation. (Reservations). They pay Government for secerity such as Army, Navy ect. And other things."

Who should be in control of Indian Gaming dollars?

"I don't have the right formula at this time."

What should these monies by used for?

"Sit down and make the rules. Rules should stay the same. Indian gambling is one of the few partners that has done good with Government. Better save your money. It won't always be like that - look at farming."



James Doyle-

EDUCATION

Identify the unique educational needs of Native students. Please list them below.

"Closing the achievement gap between children of color and their peers continues to be one of our state's biggest challenges. Far too many economically disadvantaged students are being left behind by a school finance system that is broken."

"That is why I have proposed a complete reform of the school financing system to make it fairer and guarantee that every Wisconsin student can get a good education, no matter where they live or how much money their parents have."

"I also believe the state needs to make a commitment to investing in early childhood education and development including nutrition and family literacy programs, four-year old kindergarten, and smaller class sizes."

"There is no doubt that an academic achievement gap exists between American Indians and whites. For example, since 1998-99, the gap between the percentage of American Indian /Alaskan Natives and whites scoring proficient or better on 4th, 8th and 10th grade reading and math tests decreased only on the 4th grade reading test; the gap either increased or remained the same on 4th grade math, and 8th and 10th grade math and reading tests."

"An emphasis on American Indian language and culture can help close the achievement gap. Research shows connections between well-designed and implemented language and culture education programs for American Indian students and

a) stronger personal and cultural identities
b) increased proficiency in English
c) decreased risk of drop out, gang activity, AODA issues
d) significant measurable gains in academic"

"Successful programs leading to increases in academic achievement use local tribal language and culture and include strong elements of community involvement and control."

"Prevention of discrimination and harassment is crucial in ensuring successful school environments and closing achievement gaps. Student learning will be impeded in a stressful setting where individuals feel threatened, demeaned or unappreciated."

Do you support the development of an Office of Indian Education to address issues identified by the Native peoples in Wisconsin? Explain.

"I would work closely with the Native peoples of Wisconsin, the Wisconsin Indian Education Association and with the elected State Superintendent of Public Instruction to address education issues identified by Native peoples in Wisconsin."

"I want tribal chairs and presidents to be able to talk to me directly, leader to leader, when there are issues that need to be resolved. If a separate office of Indian Affairs means that certain Native American issues receive special attention, then I may consider it. But I would rather address Native American issues through many different state agencies, rather than isolating those issues in one office, apart from the rest of state government, or in one cabinet post."

How will you support and expand the Department of Public Instruction American Indian Studies Program?

"I support the American Indian Studies Program at the Department of Public Instruction, which exists primarily to assist with the implementation of the curricular requirements in the areas of American Indian history, culture, and tribal sovereignty."

"I would also seriously consider additional investment and support of American Indian Language and Culture and Pupil Nondiscrimination Programs and grants to support diversity education initiatives."

GAMING

Explain your familiarity with the contents of Indian Gaming Compacts.

"I believe that we must ensure the stability of Indian gaming in the state, and have several ideas for achieving that, including long-term compacts. I also know that federal law regulates Indian gaming and whether or not it may take place, not state law. I would prefer that a constitutional amendment not be introduced, which could potentially be a long and expensive process and could ultimately fail. Instead, I want the Governor and the Indian Nations to exercise their current authority under the IGRA and negotiate conditions that give the needed stability to Indian gaming activities."

"I support negotiating longer term Tribal-State gaming compacts. I would negotiate with the Nations to attempt to conclude compacts with an indefinite term provided they could be reopened by either party to resolve specified issues and provided we could reach agreement on a dispute resolution procedure for any disputes arising from the reopening of any compacts. Indian gaming is a large, permanent enterprise in this state, and the state should recognize that and establish compacts that ensure long-term stability for both Indian gaming and the State."

Who should be in control of Indian Gaming dollars?

"I will certainly include in the budget the utilization of fees paid to the state under the gaming compacts. I don't believe that it is necessary to include in the budget or in state law the requirement that all state agencies consult with Tribal governments, because as Governor, I will appoint the state agency leaders, and I will order them to consult with the tribes. I will also personally consult with the tribal leaders on issues that are important to them."

What should these monies be used for?

"I believe that it is reasonable to expect that part of the compact negotiations should include fees paid by the Indian Nations that are used to pay for expenses associated with Indian gaming enterprises. Those expenses would include, as examples, state regulation of gaming, local government infrastructure and services associated with gaming establishments, and other local investments in the communities where the establishments are located. While I do not know the dollar figure of those needed investments, I would like to work with the Nations to ensure that any payments they make to the state are reinvested in accordance with the compact agreements. I would be willing to negotiate with the Nations to establish a fee structure that adequately reflects an increase in fees relative to additional revenue generated in gaming."



Jim Young-

EDUCATION

Identify the unique educational needs of Native students. Please list them below.

"Traditional languages, cultural preservation, eliminating racist mascots from our public school system, understanding tribal and traditional governmental structures."

Do you support the development of an Office of Indian Education to address issues identified by the Native peoples in Wisconsin? Explain.

"Yes, I think this would be a great addition to our Dept of Education. This office's mission, goals and staffing should be developed and directed by the American Indian Nations of WI. I would support programs with general education funds and revenue from gaming compacts."

How will you support and expand the Department of Public Instruction American Indian Studies Program?

"I believe that all public school students should get American Indian education throughout their school days. This should be a combination of direct instructional opportunities from within the Nations and curriculum based materials developed by the tribes."

GAMING

Explain your familiarity with the contents of Indian Gaming Compacts.

"I have a basic understanding of Indian gaming compacts. There is supposed to be an exclusivity clause to help protect against competition. Fees are extorted from the tribes by the state and not used as promised."

Who should be in control of Indian Gaming dollars?

"Indian Nations and local host communities."

What should these monies by used for?

"Used as the Nations and local communities see fit, hopefully to build stronger communities."

 

YOU WANT TO BE GOVERNOR?

Today's issue: Should the Crandon mine property become an active mine or a state park?

Jim Doyle
(Democrat)


"I oppose the mine and want to explore creative ways for the state to buy the land."

Scott McCallum
(Republican)


"It's not an either-or. It should be an active mine if they can do so by keeping the environment clean. And it should be a state park if it can be purchased at a good deal for the taxpayers."

Ed Thompson
(Libertarian)


"Neither." Because of a giant budget deficit, the state can't afford to buy the property for a park and shouldn't be blackmailed into buying it. Mining shouldn't be allowed unless the mining company can prove it won't put cyanide in the ground or hurt the environment. "They brought it," Thompson said of the mining company. "They own it, if they don't enjoy the land they own, maybe they can sell it to somebody else."

Jim Young
(Green)


"It should never be developed as a mine. I wounldn't mind seeing it be a state park. But I'd rather see it be an area that's co-owned and managed by the state and indigenous nations. I would look at that as being a great place for the state to show some good faith in returning land to the indigenous nations in our state."

The Wisconsin State Journal will run an issue each day until Nov. 3, when a summary of all questions the candidates have answered will be published.
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Gubernatorial Candidates� Positions on Mining in Wisconsin

The Crandon mine, as well as mining in general, has been a priorityissue for the Wisconsin Stewardship Network since its beginnings. The outcome of November's election will have a significant impact on mining in Wisconsin. As part of the mining committee's issue work, we contacted the four front-running gubernatorial candidates to ask them their position on the Crandon mine and upcoming mining legislation. If a candidate did not respond, we included information from their website or from other public statements. Their answers are presented below without bias.

Please read them and get out the vote on November 5!
-Claire Schmidt and Jim Wise


Candidate Name: Attorney General Jim Doyle - Democratic Party

What is your position on the proposed Crandon mine?

I do not support opening up a mine that would cause irreversible damage to Wisconsin�s precious natural resources. The proposed Crandon mine is in one of the most environmentally sensitive areas of the state, surrounded by wetlands, lakes and streams that feed the Wolf River, a National Wild and Scenic River. Current laws are inadequate to protect our water and our land from destruction and devastation if the Crandon mine project moves forward. As Governor, I would reopen and pursue discussions about possible state purchase of the land to protect the headwaters of the Wolf, and look for creative ways to make that possible.

What is your position on legislation to ban the use of cyanide in Wisconsin mines?

I am a strong supporter of legislation that would ban the use of cyanide in mining.

Using cyanide in mining is both unsafe and unneeded, and poses a real threat to our environment and our people. During the last session, I repeatedly urged the Legislature and the Governor to take action on passing the cyanide ban and a bill that would end special treatment for mining companies. When the legislature failed to act, I asked Gov. McCallum to call a special session to act on the mining bills, but he responded that Wisconsin�s mining laws were some of the best in the country. As Governor, I will work to pass legislation that prohibits mining companies from using cyanide in mining.

What is your position on legislation to end �special treatment� to mining companies?

I support legislation that would end special treatment for mining companies by eliminating the exemption for mining waste from the state�s hazardous waste laws. Mining waste is clearly hazardous waste, and it makes absolutely no sense to give preferential treatment to companies that we know produce waste that is harmful and dangerous to our environment and our people. As Governor, one of my priorities will be working to pass stronger mining laws. The state needs to provide safeguards and protections that will preserve our pristine natural resources for future generations.

What is your position on writing rules to implement the Mining Moratorium?

I support requiring the Department of Natural Resources to write rules that would better define and implement the Mining Moratorium Law. This is an important law that establishes new environmental standards that mining companies must meet before they can open up a mine in Wisconsin. The law should be clear, and the DNR should begin the task of writing these rules.

(Submitted 10/10 via e-mail)

Candidate Name: Jim Young - Wisconsin Green Party

What is your position on the Crandon Mine?

The Crandon mine should never be built. We must protect the environment, tourism industry and different cultures of this great area. The land involved in this proposed venture should be bought through a cooperative effort between the state and the tribes, with local governments and other interested parties contributing funds if they wish. This area should then be cared for and nurtured through a cooperative resource management effort between the state and tribal governments with equal decision making powers for each participant (one vote for each participating entity) Of course the state could always just return the land to the participating tribes as a show of respect and reparations for past (and maybe current) efforts at cultural genocide.

What is your position on legislation to ban the use of cyanide in Wisconsin mines?

The use of cyanide should be banned from all mining operations in Wisconsin (and the US). As governor, I will sign this legislation.

What is your position on legislation to end special treatment to mining companies?

All mining companies should be held to the same standards as other Wisconsin businesses. I believe that we must return to a "no degradation" standard for all businesses and municipalities in Wisconsin relative to water, land and air. Because of their dismal history and current practices, no new sulfide mining operations should be permitted at the current time. I propose that we create laws that call for initial local and tribal referenda for approval of a project with a subsequent statewide vote to finalize commencement of the project.

What is your position on writing rules to implement the Mining Moratorium?

The DNR should immediately write rules that uphold the intent and facilitate the implementation of the Mining Moratorium Law. The DNR should stop wasting its time and resources (opportunity costs) trying to usher the mining companies through our loophole ridden resource protection laws. We have a constitutional mandate to protect the public domain. We also have an inherent responsibility as the current stewards of Wisconsin to protect our natural, life-sustaining environments from degradation, the abuses of private interests and short sighted policy decisions for future generations.

Other comments:

The ongoing threats to and continued degradation of our water resources in Wisconsin must be ended. The Green Party and my campaign are dedicated to making this a standard consideration in the decisions relative to the budgets and legislation that I sign. I believe that the state constitution should be amended to allow co-management of our natural resources with the Indigenous Nations that share this area we call Wisconsin.

Candidate Name: Ed Thompson - Libertarian Party

What is your position on the Crandon Mine?

The environmental reports must be completely promptly and reviewed. There is no excuse for miles of delay. Review the science and take action. If the mine cannot be operated safely, the no mining is allowed. Buying the Crandon mine property is definitely not the answer. This is just blackmail. Buying the Crandon mine land to protect the environment from pollution amounts to either rewarding (1) a company for threatening to pollute the environment or (2) opposition to a mine that is safe for the environment. It has to be one or the other. If we start buying land every time there is a threat of pollution, we are just rewarding irresponsible actions and threats.

What is your position on legislation to ban the use of cyanide in Wisconsin mines?

The information I have seen indicates that cyanide should not be used in mining. As governor, I will have the available information fully reviewed and make a decision based on sound science.

What is your position on legislation to end special treatment to mining companies?

I oppose special treatment for mines regarding pollution. The environment is so important. It is the air we breathe, the water we drink, and the soil where our food grows. Mines should be held to the same environmental standards as are other activities. We need to ensure that our environment is protected from pollution, fairly and honestly, without special protections for some polluters. I have refused to take special interest money in this campaign�and even returned it�to make it clear that I will make fair and honest decisions in the best interest of the people of Wisconsin.

What is your position on writing rules to implement the Mining Moratorium?

The end goal of environmental law in Wisconsin should be protecting our air, water and other natural resources from pollution. It does not make sense to single out mines for a moratorium. The threat of pollution, not a particular industry, must be addressed. Pollution is dangerous no matter the source. We need to hold the big polluters accountable. Anyone who harms our environment must repair the damage and compensate victims. I firmly believe this simple rule: If you make the mess, you should clean it up. Too often the fat cats who make big political donations get away with pollution, leaving us to carry the freight. That is just plain wrong. As governor, I will stand up to polluters and hold them accountable for harming our health, violating our property rights, and contaminating our environment.

Candidate Name: Governor Scott McCallum - Republican Party

Governor McCallum was unable to respond to our questionnaire; below find several recent quotes on the Crandon mine issue.


From Governor McCallum�s website:
�Governor McCallum is committed to protecting and improving the quality of our air, land and water. During his tenure in state government, he has been involved in enacting many laws, regulations, and partnerships intended to protect and improve our air, land and water.

Governor McCallum supports the Mining Moratorium Bill that created more stringent requirements for the approval of metallic mines. The DNR will verify that the metallic mining permit applicant has submitted examples of mines in operation that meet certain conditions. Most importantly, examples submitted must be mines that have been closed for ten years without violating an environmental law and without causing significant environmental pollution of the groundwater or surface water.

Governor McCallum supports the current metallic mining regulatory framework that was developed through a thoughtful, deliberative process, and included perspectives from a variety [of] groups which traditionally have not easily found common ground. Governor McCallum believes that these measures, along with the strength of our existing laws, protect Wisconsin's air, land and water from the possible harms of an inadequate metallic mining operation.

The proposal for the State of Wisconsin to purchase the Nicolet Minerals Company property in the vicinity of the proposed Crandon Mine project is an intriguing idea that deserves further consideration and discussion. Governor McCallum plans to meet with all interested parties regarding this proposal and will be reviewing all possible outcomes and consequences that this proposal may have on the environment and the Northwoods community.�

9/13/02 From Governor McCallum�s press release on his decision not to continue negotiations for the state acquisition of the Crandon mine:

�I believe this decision reflects the sentiments of many Crandon-area citizens who have serious reservations about the possible loss of jobs if the state were to acquire the Nicolet property. Mining is an important economic driver in the Crandon area and the concerns of citizens definitely played a role in our decision to stop negotiations.�

9/18/02 From the Eau Claire Leader Telegram.

Leader Telegram: So you don�t think the Crandon mine proposal is dead?

Governor McCallum: I do not. I don�t think it�s dead. ... They may have some other interested buyers. I�ll tell you what I do know is ... I�m not going to have the state get into running a business (by buying the mine).

I was truly amazed that (Doyle) was critical of my not purchasing (the mine) at the price that was being talked about. It was a bad deal for taxpayers, it was a bad deal for jobs, it was a bad deal for the environment, the costs to the Stewardship Fund....


Claire Schmidt Mining Campaign Director
Local Issues Coordinator
Wisconsin�s Environmental Decade
122 State Street Suite 200
Madison, WI 53703
(608) 251-7020
(608) 251-1655f
www.environmentaldecade.org
schmidtc@environmentaldecade.org

 

 
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Gubernatorial debate on Crandon mine

October 7, 2002
full debate transcript:
http://www.wispolitics.com/freeser/features/f0210/f02100703.html

Ed Walters: The Crandon mine at the headwaters of the Wolf River in northern Wisconsin is a controversial issue. Some say the mine would create needed jobs and give a boost to that area's economy. But others say the mine would threaten the environment and tourism. What are your views on the subject, and should the state buy the property to stop the mining project?

Jim Doyle: I don't think the mine is a good idea for Wisconsin. I think that the long-term economic benefits to this state really depend on clean air, clean water and a beautiful environment. I don't believe that the mine, as proposed, would further that. I have supported legislation that would stop certain portions of that proposal. For example, we should not be allowing the use of cyanide in mining in Wisconsin. We should make mines have to comply with the same hazardous waste laws as we do landfills and industrial operations.

With respect to buying the land, I guess I'm disappointed that the governor cut off the negotiations as quickly as he did. I was sort of waiting to see what the price would be. And I know what he said the price would be. But I guess I'm interested to hear from the other side what the price is. It really depends, of course, what the dollars are and whether or not that is a good deal. But I do-- For me, personally, I do not think the mine is in the best interests of the future of Wisconsin.

If I could use a minute, in the last question, Governor McCallum indicated that somehow the legislative fiscal bureau would say property taxes would go up under my plan. This was a paper that they did years ago before I ever talked about my plan. And newspapers around the state that have looked at the governor's ad about this have called it ludicrous, deceptive, manure. It is simply untrue and just saying it over and over again doesn't make it more true.

John Laabs: Thank you. Mr. McCallum on the Crandon mine.

Scott McCallum: I will on the Crandon mine. But first of all, take it to an independent group. Because it is absolutely correct. The numbers are right. And saying things like that doesn't change it. So, I don't mind an independent group look at it. You take spending caps off, property taxes go up in Wisconsin.

We have some of the toughest standards and the toughest laws in the environment in the state of Wisconsin. In the country. In our state. And those laws ought to be adhered to. I'm proud of having tough environmental laws, and I'm proud of my environmental record of things that we've been able to do working in a bipartisan fashion in the state of Wisconsin. I did suggest that I would look at having the state, with our environmental fund, purchasing the Crandon mine property. When negotiations took place, discussions were done, I saw the price. And I've got to say from the perspective of Wisconsin taxpayers, that's why I was just shocked that the attorney general suggested we should have made that purchase. To purchase the land and mineral rights, when's the state is not going to run a mine, is beyond what any taxpayer ought to expect to take place in the state. And furthermore, it would have depleted our environmental fund. The stewardship fund. So, it would have hurt on all fronts. It was absolutely the wrong thing to do. I'm going to make the right decisions for the future of the state to protect tax dollars and if we need tougher laws, I have supported them, I will move ahead in that direction.

 

 
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Jim Doyle, A WisPolitics.com Exclusive Interview of Democratic gubernatorial nominee

by Jeff Mayers,
August 12, 2002
(before Sept. 10 primary victory)


Mayers: Let me ask you about the Crandon Mine buyout proposal. What's your reaction to that?

Doyle: I'm waiting to see what the deal is. I mean, we're just all talking about something floating around, and...

Mayers: How does that strike you, though, the idea of using Stewardship money to buy mineral rights?

Doyle: When I finally see this deal I will tell you what I'm looking for. ... We have to base this not on whether somebody threatens to go ahead with a mine if we don't buy them out. We have to base it on whether it's a decent use of Stewardship money. And to me, we've got to see what the price tag is, and what exactly the property is that they're considering buying. If you're talking about sensitive headwaters of the Wolf River, and the price is right, I wouldn't necessarily be against it. But I think ... (if it's) actually buying out just to keep them from having, to go through the mine (permitting) process, then I think a lot of people -- me included -- may threaten to open a mine in northern Wisconsin. To me what I think should happen is the Legislature should pass tougher mining laws that meet modern technological standards, including banning the use of cyanide in mining and including requiring the mines to have to comply with the same kind of wastewater provisions as industrial sites. And I doubt very much that the mine could get approval with those sort of things. ....We should just judge it on its own term. Is the land that's going to be put up for purchase a suitable land for Stewardship? Does it have real, sensible environmental effects, and if it does, i it might be a good deal. So, I guess I'm just like everybody else. I am waiting to see what the deal is.

 

KATHY FALK, Democratic candidate for governor

For Immediate Release June 20, 2002
Contact: Scot Ross
Phone: 608-442-1819
http://www.thewheelerreport.com/releases/Jun02/0620falkcrandon.PDF


Falk Supports End to Crandon Mine Controversy ;
Former Public Intervenor Has Fought Mine Project Since 1970s

(Madison) - Kathleen Falk, Dane County Executive and Democratic candidate for governor, offered support today for efforts to end the Crandon Mine controversy. Falk has spent the last four decades fighting to protect clean air and water for people in every corner of Wisconsin.

"I don't think this mine would have received the permits to operate, but we must make sure we are protecting the safety and health of the Wolf River and Wisconsin," Falk said. "My detailed environmental package released in April calls for an end to the Crandon Mine controversy."

Falk served for 12 years as the state's Public Intervenor, or "environmental watchdog" and was co-Director of Wisconsin's Environmental Decade. She has opposed the Crandon Mine because the mining company has been unable to demonstrate the mine will not harm the environment, including the groundwater and the Wolf River.

Falk said she supports some use of Stewardship funds if the state pays a fair market value and the companies are not enriched.

"There is broad opposition to this mine, because the mining company hasn't shown they can operate without threatening our water," Falk said. "We have to be careful to preserve our valuable Stewardship funds. The company shouldn't profit for a project that I don't believe was going to receive the go-ahead." Falk's 12-page comprehensive environmental agenda, "Preserving Wisconsin for Our Children" is available at http://www.falkforgovernor.com/images/Preserving_Wisconsin_for_Our_Children.pdf


U.S. Rep. Tom Barrett, Democratic Candidate for Governor

June 20, 2002
Contact: Brigid O'Brien
414.476.2002      414.559.7444

Barrett Optimistic About Crandon Mine Purchase Proposal
U.S. Rep. Tom Barrett, Democratic Candidate for Governor, today said he was optimistic that the proposal to buy the property of the Crandon Mine with state funds could lead to a positive end to the decades-long battle over the land.

"It is very promising that we've finally got a proposal on the table that could be the answer to ending this dispute over the Crandon Mine," said Barrett. "This a real sign toward progress, and I want to see us continue to move forward toward a resolution. We should also be mindful that the 'devil is in the details,' and that any final remedy both protects Wisconsin taxpayers and preserves the headwaters of the Wolf River and our groundwater supply."

"I would like to see Wisconsin taxpayers get a fair price for the land, and any final settlement ought to provide a fair and permanent resolution to the dispute. But I'm hopeful that all parties - state, local, tribal governments and interested groups - can work together to come to a positive final agreement. This is the most promising first step we've seen toward that end in many years," said Barrett.

Barrett has long said that Wisconsin's health and safety must be the highest priority in the debate over the proposed mine, and said today's proposal is an encouraging development both for resolution of this drawn-out dispute, and ensuring our state's pristine resources are preserved for future generations.

 

Jim Young, Green Candidate for Governor

June 20, 2002
Contact: Young for Governor Campaign
(608) 837-6987


Candidate Young Applauds Wolf River Headwaters Protection Purchase
Green Party candidate for Governor Jim Young supports the proposal to acquire the proposed Crandon Mine property and mineral rights, and pledges, as Governor, to secure financial resources to make it a reality.

The Wolf River Headwaters Protection Purchase would allow for public acquisition of all the property owned by Nicolet Minerals Company for the proposed Crandon Mine.

"This is the most significant movement in environmental justice that I have seen in my 16 years of working on Treaty Rights,� said Young. �We are on the verge of a great victory for the people of Wisconsin that bodes well for people around the world."

"At the Indigenous Mining Summit this past weekend in Mole Lake, we discussed our vision for this site without a mine,� said Young.

An alliance of environmental and conservation groups and local and tribal governments released a detailed proposal designed to permanently end the controversy over permitting the Crandon mine.

The proposal, called the Wolf River Headwaters Protection Purchase, states "At this unique moment in Wisconsin�s history we make a uniquely Wisconsin proposal -- public acquisition of all of the property (nearly 5,000 acres of land and mineral rights) owned by Nicolet Minerals Company (NMC) in the vicinity of the proposed mine site as a conservation area devoted to sustainable land management practices, tribal cultural values and tourism suitable to this environmentally sensitive area.�

The buyout plan has Young�s complete support. "As Governor, I will ensure Wisconsin finds the financial resources to purchase this property in cooperation with Indigenous Nations,� said Young, whose platform calls for the co-management of environmental resources by the state and tribal nations.

"I continue to oppose all new metallic mining projects and to support a ban on the use of cyanide in mining projects."

Recently, BHP Billiton communicated to the alliance a willingness to consider a public purchase of the site. The alliance has responded with the proposal sent to Governor McCallum and legislative leaders today.

Young recognized the work and dedication of those who are working to "I applaud the tireless efforts of the town of Nashville, the Menomonee Nation, Sakaogon and other Chippewa Nations, Forest County Potowatomi, the Midwest Treaty Network, the Green Party and the many environmental organizations and individuals to bring this idea to fruition."

--------------------
September 13, 2002
--------------------

Contact:
Amy Heart, WIGP Co-Spokesperson
(608) 20 � GREEN
mail@wigp.org

Jim Young Campaign Headquarters
(608) 837-6987

GREEN�S YOUNG DERIDES GOVERNOR�S CRANDON MINE DECISION

SUN PRAIRIE - Green Party gubernatorial candidate Jim Young said Governor McCallum�s decision to not pursue the purchase of the Crandon Mine site is wrong for the environment and the economy of northern Wisconsin.

�We need real leadership in this state that protects the public domain; that considers the impacts of decisions on future generations,� said Young.

Young is the only gubernatorial candidate who has stated he supports the proposal to acquire the proposed Crandon Mine property and mineral rights; and pledged as Governor to secure financial resources to make it a reality. �I will find the money to make this happen at a fair price to the people of this state,� said Young.

Contrary to McCallum�s statement, Young said the mine will not create a sustainable economy for residents in the state. �The boom and bust economies that come from the mining industry will not support our northern communities, and taxpayers will be paying for the environmental damage and cleanup for hundreds of years to come,� said Young.

�The economy in northern Wisconsin is reliant upon clean water and a clean environment, and my administration won�t gamble with the environmental integrity and the strength of the tourism industry in northern Wisconsin for the short-term profits for international corporations,� said Young.

McCallum also stated the state�s Stewardship Funds should not be used for this purchase. � I question whether the Governor is trying to make a joke out of the Stewardship Funds,� said Young, who said this is a perfect example of when and how the funds should be used. �The funds will enhance and protect the environmental integrity of an area in northern Wisconsin that is threatened.�

In addition to the purchase of the Crandon Mine property and mining rights, Young also calls for a moratorium on mining in Wisconsin until mining technology has been proven to not degrade our environment. �Wisconsin will not be a guinea pig for international profits,� said Young.

The Wolf River Headwaters Protection Purchase would allow for public acquisition of all the property owned by Nicolet Minerals Company for the proposed Crandon Mine.

"This is the most significant movement in environmental justice that I have seen in my 16 years of working on Treaty Rights,� said Young, whose platform calls for the co-management of environmental resources by the state and tribal nations. �We are on the verge of a great victory for the people of Wisconsin that bodes well for people around the world."

An alliance of environmental and conservation groups and local and tribal governments released a detailed proposal designed to permanently end the controversy over permitting the Crandon mine.

The proposal, called the Wolf River Headwaters Protection Purchase, states "At this unique moment in Wisconsin�s history we make a uniquely Wisconsin proposal -- public acquisition of all of the property (nearly 5,000 acres of land and mineral rights) owned by Nicolet Minerals Company (NMC) in the vicinity of the proposed mine site as a conservation area devoted to sustainable land management practices, tribal cultural values and tourism suitable to this environmentally sensitive area.�

Information on the Wolf River Headwaters Protection Purchase is available at:
http://treaty.indigneousnative.org/buyout.html

For additional information on Jim Young�s campaign for Governor visit:
www.young4governor.org.

 

 


More statements from other candidates forthcoming......

LEGISLATORS' REACTIONS ( FREE .PDF  ACROBAT READER acrobat reader)


Assembly Representative Spencer Black
http://www.thewheelerreport.com/releases/Jun02/0620blackmine.PDF
State Senator Dave Hansen
http://www.thewheelerreport.com/releases/Jun02/0620hansencrandon.PDF
State Senator Jim Baumgart
http://www.thewheelerreport.com/releases/Jun02/0620baumgartcrandon.PDF
Senator Kevin Shibilski
http://www.wispolitics.com/freeser/pr/pr0206/jun20/pr02062038.html

 
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YOUNG REACTION


September 13, 2002

Contact:
Amy Heart, WIGP Co-Spokesperson
(608) 20 � GREEN
mail@wigp.org

Jim Young Campaign Headquarters
(608) 837-6987

GREEN�S YOUNG DERIDES GOVERNOR�S CRANDON MINE DECISION

SUN PRAIRIE - Green Party gubernatorial candidate Jim Young said Governor McCallum�s decision to not pursue the purchase of the Crandon Mine site is wrong for the environment and the economy of northern Wisconsin.

�We need real leadership in this state that protects the public domain; that considers the impacts of decisions on future generations,� said Young.

Young is the only gubernatorial candidate who has stated he supports the proposal to acquire the proposed Crandon Mine property and mineral rights; and pledged as Governor to secure financial resources to make it a reality. �I will find the money to make this happen at a fair price to the people of this state,� said Young.

Contrary to McCallum�s statement, Young said the mine will not create a sustainable economy for residents in the state. �The boom and bust economies that come from the mining industry will not support our northern communities, and taxpayers will be paying for the environmental damage and cleanup for hundreds of years to come,� said Young.

�The economy in northern Wisconsin is reliant upon clean water and a clean environment, and my administration won�t gamble with the environmental integrity and the strength of the tourism industry in northern Wisconsin for the short-term profits for international corporations,� said Young.

McCallum also stated the state�s Stewardship Funds should not be used for this purchase. � I question whether the Governor is trying to make a joke out of the Stewardship Funds,� said Young, who said this is a perfect example of when and how the funds should be used. �The funds will enhance and protect the environmental integrity of an area in northern Wisconsin that is threatened.�

In addition to the purchase of the Crandon Mine property and mining rights, Young also calls for a moratorium on mining in Wisconsin until mining technology has been proven to not degrade our environment. �Wisconsin will not be a guinea pig for international profits,� said Young.

The Wolf River Headwaters Protection Purchase would allow for public acquisition of all the property owned by Nicolet Minerals Company for the proposed Crandon Mine.

"This is the most significant movement in environmental justice that I have seen in my 16 years of working on Treaty Rights,� said Young, whose platform calls for the co-management of environmental resources by the state and tribal nations. �We are on the verge of a great victory for the people of Wisconsin that bodes well for people around the world."

An alliance of environmental and conservation groups and local and tribal governments released a detailed proposal designed to permanently end the controversy over permitting the Crandon mine.

The proposal, called the Wolf River Headwaters Protection Purchase, states "At this unique moment in Wisconsin�s history we make a uniquely Wisconsin proposal -- public acquisition of all of the property (nearly 5,000 acres of land and mineral rights) owned by Nicolet Minerals Company (NMC) in the vicinity of the proposed mine site as a conservation area devoted to sustainable land management practices, tribal cultural values and tourism suitable to this environmentally sensitive area.�

Information on the Wolf River Headwaters Protection Purchase is available at:
http://treaty.indigneousnative.org/buyout.html

For additional information on Jim Young�s campaign for Governor visit:
www.young4governor.org.

 

 
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DOYLE REACTION



Friday, September 13, 2002
For More Information:
John Kraus, (608) 347-4759


Doyle Criticizes McCallum's Sudden Reversal on the Purchase of the Crandon Mine

Jim Doyle, Democratic candidate for Governor said Friday that Gov. Scott McCallum's sudden reversal on the state purchase of the Crandon Mine property is "bad news for Wisconsin's environment."

"Gov. McCallum announced this proposed purchase with much fanfare," Doyle said. "Now, with little or no apparent work done on the issue, the governor has reversed his position. Once again, the mine will start to move forward without McCallum taking any positive action to help protect these environmentally sensitive lands."

Last April, Doyle urged the McCallum to call a special session of the Legislature to protect Wisconsin's natural resources in relation to metallic mineral mining in the state. Doyle proposed that two bills be passed, to ban the use of cyanide in mining and to eliminate the exemption for mining waste from the state's hazardous waste laws.

"Using cyanide in mining is both unsafe and unneeded," Doyle said. "The technology is already in use that is much safer for the environment. Wisconsin should ensure that mining companies use the best available, least toxic technologies and that they have to treat their waste as the hazardous material that it is."

The proposed mine is in one of the most environmentally sensitive areas of the state, surrounded by wetlands, lakes and streams that feed the Wolf River, a National Wild and Scenic River. The mining company proposes to use between 5 million and 13 million pounds of cyanide over the proposed 30 year life of the mine. The wastes from the mine will be stored untreated on-site in a single lined landfill-like facility that will cover an area larger than 200 football fields.

"This was a leadership test for the Governor and he has failed," Doyle said. "This important issue must be addressed. Wisconsin's natural resources deserve strong action before it's too late."

 

 

 
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Doyle: State environment deserves better than McCallum



Green Bay News Chronicle
October 14, 2002
http://www.greenbaynewschron.com/page.html?article=116316


The Democratic candidate would re-open discussions on buying the Nicolet Mine property

By Michelle Kennedy
News-Chronicle

Even though Nicolet Minerals has pulled out of the Crandon Mine, pending approval of a mining permit by the Department of Natural Resources, residents of the Wolf River area are still concerned that if the permit is approved waste from the cyanide-laced mine could do irreparable damage to the Wolf River and the surrounding area.

Democratic Gubernatorial Candidate and Attorney General Jim Doyle came to Green Bay Sunday and said that he would re-open discussions on public purchase of the mine and look for creative new ways to finance it if he is elected governor.

"It would be a major financial investment," Doyle said. "It may turn out, at the end of the day, that it is not feasible. There are many uncertainties. But I know one thing for certain, it won't happen unless we try. The governor has already walked away from this issue with no real effort to determine a fair price or negotiate an agreement."

The Stewardship Fund has been the primary source of funding for acquiring land for the state. Doyle said, however, that the state should look into partnering with other sources, including the state Board of Public Lands, in order to finance land purchases.

The proposed Crandon Mine is in one of the most pristine areas in Wisconsin and is surrounded by wetlands. Nicolet Mining Co. has proposed to use between five and 13 million pounds of cyanide over the proposed 30-year life of the mine. Waste would be stored untreated on-site in a single lined landfill-like facility covering an area larger than 200 football fields.

According to the Clean Water Action Council of Northeast Wisconsin, sodium cyanide is "acutely toxic to any living thing." Even small amounts of cyanide can kill fish. For example, "cyanide measured at 20-80 parts per billion can kill rainbow and brown trout. Birds and mammals that drink water or feed on cyanide-poisoned wildlife can be killed at 40-200 parts per million, an amount also fatally toxic to humans.

"Leftover cyanide at very small concentrations has harmed birds and other wildlife which drank mine pond wastewater. Cyanide is a powerful solvent which pulls heavy metals, such as mercury, cadmium, chromium, and lead, out of the rock into a dissolved state.

"These toxic metals end up as waste products which need to be dumped. Cyanide can also break down and form complexes with other chemicals or metals, and still remain as toxic. Mixes of cyanide with other metals and chemicals can be just as toxic as cyanide itself, but they are not routinely monitored or carefully regulated."

Last year, Doyle called on McCallum to call a special session of the legislature to pass two bills that would protect Wisconsin's natural resources from mining, one banning the use of cyanide in mining and the other eliminating the exemption for mining waste from the state's hazardous waste law.

"Gov. McCallum's response was that our mining laws do not need any improvement, because they are among the best in the country," Doyle said.

A statement released by the McCallum campaign on Sunday blasted Doyle's proposal to spend money to buy the mine. "Apparently, Jim Doyle is willing to put the state's Stewardship Fund in jeopardy just to get elected," the statement said.

 

 
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Doyle says he's open to renewing talks on Crandon mine property



By Thomas Rozwadowski
Green Bay Press-Gazette, Oct. 14, 2002


Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jim Doyle announced Sunday that he would re-open discussions on public purchase of the Crandon mine if he is elected governor.

At a news conference in Green Bay, Doyle said the Crandon mine issue is "a test of our priorities and our commitment to the environment." While citing the risk of such a "major financial investment," Doyle said the project was a challenge and opportunity worth exploring thoroughly.

After two appraisals placed the value of the land and mineral rights between $51.2 million and $94 million, Republican Gov. Scott McCallum announced last month that the state wouldn't buy the 5,000-acre mine property because of its expense.

McCallum campaign spokesman Darrin Schmitz reiterated that Sunday.

"Scott McCallum will not abuse taxpayer dollars for paying astronomical prices for the mine," Schmitz said.

Doyle, however, said purchase of the mine is "in the interest of Wisconsin's long-term environmental and economic security."

Through his work on the Board of Public Land Commissioners, Doyle said he recognizes the potential to identify innovative ways to preserve land that do not use tax dollars.

The state's Stewardship Fund, which now totals $241.8 million, is the primary source of funding for recreational and conservation land purchases. However, because of budget concerns, Doyle said the state should look for other partners and sources of financing, including the state Board of Public Lands, private interests, nonprofit groups or land trusts.

"It won't happen unless we try," Doyle said. "It will never happen under a McCallum administration. The governor has already walked away from the issue with no real effort to determine a fair price or negotiate an agreement." Doyle also stressed passing stronger mining laws and enacting a ban on the use of cyanide in mining.

Since 1994, Nicolet Minerals has sought state, local and federal permits to mine 55 million tons of ore from the mine just south of Crandon, near the headwaters of the Wolf River.

The state ordered appraisals of the land after McCallum said in June he would consider a proposal from a coalition of conservation groups and tribal governments for the state to in essence buy out the project.

The state pulled out of the talks with the mining company and its parent company, BHP Billiton of Melbourne, Australia, on Sept. 13, saying the property was too expensive.

Within days of the state's decision, BHP Billiton, which owns Nicolet, said it was closing its office in Crandon and would try to sell the mine project.

 

 

 

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TOP
Dem. gub. nominee Jim Doyle on Crandon Mine Issue
Articles and Statments on proposed Crandon mine site buyout
Wolf River Watershed Protection Purchase falls through
The Wolf River Headwaters Protection Purchase
Cyanide in Mining
Midwest Treaty Network contant page